20 Mar

General

Posted by: Tracy Price

BUYING OR SELLING THIS YEAR? START RIGHT HERE!                                    

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BUYERS, this powerful breakthrough CHRP program allows you to add up to $40,000 on top of the purchase price on MLS Resale homes. Yes it’s true, you can do it, but it is only available exclusively through us and an approved participating Buyer Realtor. 

Let’s face it, most homes need some form of upgrading whether it be a new kitchen, bathroom, flooring, windows etc. The problem is that most home buyers scrimp and save just to meet the down payment and closing costs. So they have nothing left over for improvements. Until now that is. 

Now, you can literally have your cake and eat it too. Call us today to be qualified for the maximum purchase price you can afford plus up to a maximum of $40,000* for renovation. All funds are available on closing with your mortgage, all at the same great low low mortgage rate saving you big.  Of course you can buy at a lower price and lower reno cost, we just set it up at the maximum if you need it.  It’s your choice. 

Then as soon as you start shopping with one of our top realtor partners, you will better be able to see yourselves in that special home that you will be able to renovate to your tastes, and truly make into your home, the home of your dreams. 

CHRP is not available through the banks,  credit unions or other mortgage companies, it is an exclusive from us to you. 

 

SELLERS, did you know that over 95% of home buyers are not satisfied with the homes they purchase. This according to a survey by the National Association of Realtors.  Now imagine your home becoming PRE-CERTIFIED for a CHRP RENOVATION LOAN.  Now it is more appealing and attractive to potential home buyers and it will stand out from the competition. It also is that much more likely to sell faster than the house down the street that is not CHRP Pre-Certified isn’t it? 

Makes sense doesn’t it?  Please call us for further details. 

 

  

11 Mar

Feels Like Spring. But Doesn’t Look or Smell Like Spring

General

Posted by: Tracy Price

 

 Phew what a never ending winter. Just like the ones when I was a kid. 

As for spring, well we might just ‘Spring’ right into summer this year. Let’s hope it a good one. 

As the spring buying season warms up (even though the weather doesn’t want to) rates are once again near ‘all time lows’. It’s a great time to buy/sell a home. 

Listings are picking up so the ‘choice’ of inventory of homes is growing.  

If you own and want to buy but are afraid to sell first (then be under pressure to buy), call Ron for a great solution. You can put your house on the market and buy with confidence at the same time. And believe it or not you can renovate your new home to your liking before you move in. 

Sound like the makings of a great plan. Well it is. We can help you take the ‘Pressure’ out of the buying/selling process.  

We will be announcing next week with our Realtor partners, a new program that will make selling your home so much easier and faster. And you can enter the ‘Buying’ phase will much more confidence that everything will work out to your advantage.  

Please tune in next week for full details of our amazing new SELL FIRST THEN BUY program. Most people do it the other way around, and its pressure packed. Or they don’t do it all fearing all the pressure. 

Don’t miss next week’s article from ‘PriceTeamMortgages.Ca’. 

We are your real estate and financing solutionists. Our savvy professional advice helps you see the bigger picture and makes more things possible. 

Bank 5 Year Fixed  4.99%. Our Best 5 Year Fixed 3.09% Wow, what savings!!! 

5 Mar

How We Got Mike Out Of A Big Pickle

General

Posted by: Tracy Price

 

Mike owned a house and in moved his girlfriend Susan. After a year and a bit they bought a newly built home and ported his existing bank mortgage to the new property.  

Within two months he and his girlfriend decided to part ways. He agreed to buy her out so that they did not have to continue to live together and made a deal to pay her $30,000. 

The bank told Mike he did not qualify on his own because his income was too low.  Because they had a fixed rate mortgage instead of a variable, the bank penalty was excessive at  $14,756. It would have been only $2,400. with a variable.  

Mike came to us and we went to work. At first blush his debt service ratios were too high and there did not appear to be a deal. We had to get ‘creative’ to find a solution that would work, so we crunched numbers that would work. The result was that the loan needed to be reduced and we also needed to get him a 35 year amortization (the bank used 25 years). We then advised MIke that if his girlfriend paid half the penalty (which is fair) to reduce the required loan amount (and debt service ratios) then we might have a chance of getting it approved. 

Because we have so many lenders, some of who will stretch guidelines when credit is excellent, (which it was) and they value our relationship with them and the volume we send them, they will be more flexible with our deals.  

We did need to shop and plead Mike’s case to 3 lenders. We were successful in securing a lower rate and monthly payment (even with the added penalty) than what Mike previously paid to the bank. 

The moral of this success story is that we were able to turn a bank ‘NO’ into a ‘YES’.  Fortunately since Mike had ported his old mortgage and not obtained a new bank purchase mortgage, we were able to help him. If he had had a new collateral mortgage he would have absolutely stuck with no options until maturity. 

This is a great real life example of the value of our service versus the banks. It also gives validation as to why the new bank collateral mortgages should be avoided because life circumstances like this cannot be planned. It also points out another reason for going variable mortgage versus fixed rate which the banks push for all too obvious reasons. 

 

How We Got Mike Out Of A Big Pickle 

Mike owned a house and in moved his girlfriend Susan. After a year and a bit they bought a newly built home and ported his existing bank mortgage to the new property.  

Within two months he and his girlfriend decided to part ways. He agreed to buy her out so that they did not have to continue to live together and made a deal to pay her $30,000. 

The bank told Mike he did not qualify on his own because his income was too low.  Because they had a fixed rate mortgage instead of a variable, the bank penalty was excessive at  $14,756. It would have been only $2,400. with a variable.  

Mike came to us and we went to work. At first blush his debt service ratios were too high and there did not appear to be a deal. We had to get ‘creative’ to find a solution that would work, so we crunched numbers that would work. The result was that the loan needed to be reduced and we also needed to get him a 35 year amortization (the bank used 25 years). We then advised MIke that if his girlfriend paid half the penalty (which is fair) to reduce the required loan amount (and debt service ratios) then we might have a chance of getting it approved. 

Because we have so many lenders, some of who will stretch guidelines when credit is excellent, (which it was) and they value our relationship with them and the volume we send them, they will be more flexible with our deals.  

We did need to shop and plead Mike’s case to 3 lenders. We were successful in securing a lower rate and monthly payment (even with the added penalty) than what Mike previously paid to the bank. 

The moral of this success story is that we were able to turn a bank ‘NO’ into a ‘YES’.  Fortunately since Mike had ported his old mortgage and not obtained a new bank purchase mortgage, we were able to help him. If he had had a new collateral mortgage he would have absolutely stuck with no options until maturity. 

This is a great real life example of the value of our service versus the banks. It also gives validation as to why the new bank collateral mortgages should be avoided because life circumstances like this cannot be planned. It also points out another reason for going variable mortgage versus fixed rate which the banks push for all too obvious reasons. 

 

How We Got Mike Out Of A Big Pickle 

Mike owned a house and in moved his girlfriend Susan. After a year and a bit they bought a newly built home and ported his existing bank mortgage to the new property.  

Within two months he and his girlfriend decided to part ways. He agreed to buy her out so that they did not have to continue to live together and made a deal to pay her $30,000. 

The bank told Mike he did not qualify on his own because his income was too low.  Because they had a fixed rate mortgage instead of a variable, the bank penalty was excessive at  $14,756. It would have been only $2,400. with a variable.  

Mike came to us and we went to work. At first blush his debt service ratios were too high and there did not appear to be a deal. We had to get ‘creative’ to find a solution that would work, so we crunched numbers that would work. The result was that the loan needed to be reduced and we also needed to get him a 35 year amortization (the bank used 25 years). We then advised MIke that if his girlfriend paid half the penalty (which is fair) to reduce the required loan amount (and debt service ratios) then we might have a chance of getting it approved. 

Because we have so many lenders, some of who will stretch guidelines when credit is excellent, (which it was) and they value our relationship with them and the volume we send them, they will be more flexible with our deals.  

We did need to shop and plead Mike’s case to 3 lenders. We were successful in securing a lower rate and monthly payment (even with the added penalty) than what Mike previously paid to the bank. 

The moral of this success story is that we were able to turn a bank ‘NO’ into a ‘YES’.  Fortunately since Mike had ported his old mortgage and not obtained a new bank purchase mortgage, we were able to help him. If he had had a new collateral mortgage he would have absolutely stuck with no options until maturity. 

This is a great real life example of the value of our service versus the banks. It also gives validation as to why the new bank collateral mortgages should be avoided because life circumstances like this cannot be planned. It also points out another reason for going variable mortgage versus fixed rate which the banks push for all too obvious reasons.